Make: Potato and Apple Stamp Pumpkin Art

Just in time for October – an artistic pumpkin patch, chock full of and fall spirit and featuring an elevated autumnal aesthetic! The foundation of these lovely pumpkin art prints? A potato, apple, or green pepper (three cheers for using up an in-season second as an art supply).

Five of our potato stamp pumpkin art pieces hanging on a white background.

Kids will love watching the different fruit and vegetable stamps slowly turn into a pumpkin, laying out their own pattern, picking out colors, and adding their own quirky faces or linework.

For more October mark-making magic, visit our kids ghost art project, try a stamped halftone gourd collage, or make the most gorgeous fall leaf art with tissue paper and photocopies!

To make your own potato and apple stamped pumpkin art you’ll need:

Note: We prefer to shop locally or use what we have at home, but this list contains a few Woodpeckers Crafts and/or Amazon affiliate links for reference. As Amazon Associates, we make a small commission on qualifying purchases.*

BASIC SUPPLIES:

  • Scrap cardboard and colored cardstock or construction paper
  • Assorted vegetables or fruits for stamping – these are what we used:
    • A potato
    • An apple
    • A green pepper
  • Acrylic or tempera paint
  • A foam brush or big paintbrush

OPTIONAL SUPPLIES:

  • Chalk, pastels, charcoal or other mark-making supplies
  • Dry beans (we used black beans, navy beans, and pinto beans)
  • A glue stick and/or Elmer’s glue or similar

Potato and Apple Stamp Pumpkin Art Instructions:

  1. Cut scrap cardboard into squares

    Cut scrap card into simple squares or rectangles using an X-Acto or utility knife and straight-edge.
    Cut squares from scrap cardboard.
    We cut about six squares that were 6.5-inches, and six rectangles that were 3.5-inches by 6.5-inches.

  2. Paint your cardboard squares

    Using your favorite colors of acrylic or tempera paint and a foam brush, cover your cardboard squares with a coat of paint.
    Paint your cardboard squares with acrylic or tempera paint.
    I chose to paint ours with a selection of autumnal colors, but this step is really just optional. The brown cardboard definitely has a fall feel!

  3. Wash and cut a potato in half

    We wanted to do a bit of experimenting to create a variety of sizes and shapes of pumpkins, so we used a potato, apple, and green pepper. Wash off any dirt or debris, dry, then slice in half. Cut a potato, apple or green pepper in half.
    Can you think of other fruits or vegetables you could use to create that picture-perfect pumpkin shape? Give it a try!

  4. Begin stamping!

    Cover the cut side of your halved potato, apple, or green paper with paint, then stamp, gently pressing straight down on to the paper.
    Brush paint onto your potato half and stamp onto paper or the middle of your cardboard squares.
    Note: We used a foam brush to cover our stamps with paint, simply because it seems to be more economical and saves us from having a lot of leftover paint sitting out.

  5. Cut out your stamped pumpkins and glue to a cardboard square

    Since we decided to stamp paper rather than stamp straight on the cardboard, we cut out our pumpkin shapes and used a glue stick to affix our favorites to the middle of our cardboard squares.
    Cut out stamped paper pumpkin shapes and glue onto cardboard.
    If you’ve printed on different colors of paper as we have, you can experiment with different arrangements to see what color combinations you like best!

  6. Add a paper stem

    Cut simple pumpkin stem shapes out of construction paper or a brown paper bag and use a glue stick to glue on to your pumpkins.
    Cut pumpkin stems from brown paper and glue onto your stamped pumpkins.

  7. Glue dry beans around the edge of your cardboard squares to frame

    Create simple but lovely frames for your artwork by gluing dried beans around the edges of your cardboard squares. Using Elmer’s glue, we made lines of glue, then applied the dry beans.
    Glue dry beans onto the edges of your cardboard squares to create a frame.
    You can create interesting patterns, use one color or multiples, or simply randomly sprinkle an assortment along the lines of glue.

  8. Add details to your pumpkins

    While our frames were drying, we cut jack-o-lantern features out of different colors of paper and used a glue stick to glue them to our pumpkins. Each one is brimming over with personality now!Add jack-o-lantern faces to your stamped pumpkins if you'd like!

Once you start playing with these prints you’ll realize exactly how much you can do to make them your own kind of art project. For instance, we decided to create a set without jack-o-lantern faces and used vine charcoal and white chalk to add the ribs of our pumpkins. I love how this collection plays with the positive and negative space!

Six of our potato stamp pumpkin art pieces hanging on a white background.

Not sure about adding the dried beans for the frames? Collect and trim some twigs to hot glue to the edges of your squares instead. Or just leave them plain (the pumpkins here are the real stars of the show afterall).

Four of our potato stamp pumpkin art pieces hanging on a white background.

We have bushels full of fall fun! Free printable leaf activity kit, or vegetable-stamped tote bag – perfect for fall farmers’ markets or apple-picking!

Or visit a roundup of 16+ fresh Halloween projects and activities that your kids are going to love!


*A note about affiliate links: We strive to use simple, earth-friendly supplies that can be purchased locally whenever we can, but sometimes we find the best universally available options, a rare eco-friendly find, or a niche product only available on Amazon or Woodpecker Crafts. When included in our supply list, these products are affiliate links, and if you click-through to make a purchase, we receive a small commission that helps us re-order these supplies!

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Amanda E.
With a passion for cultivating imagination, Amanda aims to help kids and families discover their creative potential through art, play, adventure, activism, conservancy, and community. Amanda has a background in graphic design, environmental design, and art curation. When not playing with ideas and designs for barley & birch, she enjoys working in freelance design, art, and illustration.

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